Category Archives: Speaking Engagements

A Biblical Theology of Servant – Audio

One of the things I most enjoy in teaching is tracing a biblical-theological theme from Genesis to Revelation. So when Brian McCrorie, the pastor of Heather Hills Baptist Church, invited me to come to his church’s leadership retreat and teach on a biblical theology of servanthood, I eagerly accepted.

So in the 75 minutes I was given, I attempted to show that because we failed to serve God in the way we were created to, God raised up servants to point forward to the ultimate servant Jesus Christ. Throughout redemptive history God gives the title “servant” to key figures such as Adam, Moses, Joshua, David, and the Isaianic servant, each of whom anticipates some aspect of Jesus’ identity.

Want to hear more? You can listen below and follow along with the handout:

A Selective and Necessarily Brief Biblical Theology of Servant (Heather Hills Study Retreat 01-09-2015) [BLANK]

 

The Responsibilities of Church Membership (Acts 2:42-47)

One of the defining characteristics of our culture is a fear of commitment. We love to keep our options open, not get ourselves locked into something that is difficult to get ourselves out of. According to a study released in 2013, by the age of 30 years old, 75% of women in the U.S. have lived with a partner without being married.[1] About 40% of those relationship ended up in marriage within three years, while nearly a third were still together living together without being married.

This lack of commitment has infected the church as well. Some churches have done away with the notion of membership altogether. Other churches still have it, but do almost nothing with it. As a result, it is common for churches to have a large number of regular attenders who are not members.

Despite its growing unpopularity, I still believe that church membership is a biblical idea. In essence, it is a formal expression of our love and commitment to Christ and his church. So what then are the responsibilities of being a member of a local church?

That is the question I sought to answer in my recent sermon at Christ’s Covenant Church. Taking Acts 2:42-47 as my text, I summarized our responsibilities as (1) be involved and (2) be invested.

If you have ever wondered what your responsibilities are as a faithful member of a local church are, I encourage you to listen and learn.

[1] http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-04-04/unmarried-couples-living-together-is-new-u-s-norm.html

“A Salvation Long Ago Foretold” – 1 Peter 1:10-12

This past Sunday I had the privilege of preaching at Christ’s Covenant Church in our continuing series on “Living in a Place that’s not our Home” from 1 Peter. My text was 1 Peter 1:10-12, and the title of the sermon is “A Salvation Long Ago Foretold.” You can find the audio here. At that same link you will find some resources I have provided that may be of assistance in reading the Bible in a gospel-centered, Christ-focused way.

Manuscript of Apologetics Talk Now Posted

This past weekend I spoke at the No Doubt Apologetics Conference in Indianpolis. They have now posted my detailed notes from the session, and should be posting audio and video in the near future. You can download the notes here.

Although I do deal very briefly with textual criticism, the majority of the presentation was on how we got our New Testament canon. You will plenty of resources for further study in the footnotes of the document as well. You are welcome to leave any feedback in the comments here.

CORRECTION: The updated version can now be found at this link.

No Doubt: True Answers to Eternal Questions

On Saturday, August 15 I will have the privilege of speaking at a one-day apologetics conference in Indianpolis entitled No Doubt: True Answers to Eternal Questions. Other speakers include Paul Maier, Greg Koukl and Tommy Mitchell. If you are in the area, I encourage you to stop in. You can register for the conference here.

I will be addressing two interrelated questions: how did we get our Bible (the issue of the canon, with emphasis on the New Testament) and is what we have what the authors wrote (the issue of textual criticism).