Category Archives: Martin Luther

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther reminds us that we do not need to be a monk to please God in our daily lives

2433. The world neither acknowledges nor believes in the hidden treasures of God; it cannot be disputed that an obedient maid, a true diligent servant, and a child-bearing wife are far above a praying monk, who does not see beyond his grub; each, however, under the command and control of God  (p. 111).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how we should handle despair:

3897. He gave this advice to someone whose faith was shaken and despaired: that he should not try to handle it alone and depend entirely on himself, rather he should seek the counsel of others and comfort from the Word of God, because no one who despaired will be strong enough  (p. 351-52).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther answers whether the arts and nature are helpful in theology:

439. In regard to whether the tools of arts and nature are useful for theology, Martin Luther said: A knife, as a tool, can have different purposes. So good tools–languages and the arts, for example, can be useful for teaching. But other knives are weapons, made for slaughter. Many. like Erasmus, are well equipped with the language and the arts, but nevertheless make damaging mistakes. There is a distinction between a useful purpose and misuse of something. Job made that distinction when he said, “You speak like one of the foolish women [Job 2:10].” I like this text because of its distinction between the proper use of something and its misuse.   (p. 267-68).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the beauty and value of music:

3996. God placed His Church in the middle of the world among endless external activities and vocations, so that Christians would not be monks, but live among the general population, so that our work and our practice of our faith would be known to the public  (p. 281).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther extols the beauty and value of music:

7034. For music is a talent and gift from God, not a human endowment. Music drives away the devil and makes people happy. Under its influence, one forgets all anger, impurity, arrogance, and other vices. I place music second only to theology, and give it the highest honors.  (p. 174).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains what the most important lesson of theology is:

2459b. The most important lesson learned from theology is to be able to acknowledge Christ. That is something a teacher should never cease from teaching from student to student  (p. 416).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther illustrates the depth and simplicity of Scriptures:

5468. Gregory correctly said: “Holy Scripture is a river in which an elephant floats and a lamb wades.” Because the intellectuals and great scholars do not understand it, but simple and humble people understand it.  (p. 374).

 

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther shares his thoughts on learning the biblical languages:

1040. Comments regarding language. The Greeks certainly have  good and lovely words, but not sentences. Their language is very friendly and charming, but not rich in sayings. The Hebrew language on the other hand is rather simple, but majestic and glorious; precise and sparse in words, but with deep meaning, which cannot be duplicated.

I learned more Hebrew when I compared one place and passage to another, than when I directed my attention solely to grammar. If I were younger, I would learn this language, for without this language one can never rightly understand Holy Scripture. Then the New Testament, although it may have been written in Greek, is nevertheless full of Hebraisms and in a Hebrew style. Therefore is has been correctly said: “The Hebrews drink from the spring, the Greeks from the water line which flows from the spring, and the Latins from the pool.

I have mastered neither Greek nor Hebrew, but nevertheless I will forage into Hebrew and Greek. But the language alone cannot make one a theologian, but is only an aid.  (p. 102).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther reminds us that God has gifted students differently:

7037. Gifted Students. They talked about what a great difference there was among the better scholars, and that not all students were equal, and some of them were outstanding, but not all of themnn would wake the dead with their oratory skills. Then Dr. Martin Luther made the comment that not all of them were equally gifted; those who were blessed by God had it. God had structured it so that the learned served the uneducated, the uneducated must humble themselves before the learned, whom they need. If everyone were equal, no one would advance, no one would serve the other, there would be no peace.

The peacock complains that it does not have the voice of the nightingale. Therefore, through inequality God has accomplished the greatest parity. For we see, when someone excels, they have more and greater blessings than others, and they become proud and arrogant, exercise dominion over the others, hold them in contempt, and rule over them. That is why God created among the general population people with varied and unequal skills, with many and unequal ranks, and each must reach out a helping hand to the other; no one can do without the other   (p. 217).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes the advantage that children have over adults:

2462. Psalm 110 is the pinnacle and head of all Scripture. It gives an account of the kingdom and the priesthood of Christ in the most splendid manner, in that it states that it Christ who rules over everything and comes for everyone and has everything in His hand. It is an excellent spiritual exposition. This Psalm is invaluable, and whenever I am sick I rely on it.  (p. 217).

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