Category Archives: Martin Luther

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther reminds us that we will never reach a complete and exhaustive understanding of Christ:

6597. No one, whether he be an apostle or prophet, and much less myself or others like me can learn all there is to know about Christ in this life, nor know and understand who and what He was. For He is the true, eternal and all-powerful God who took on mortal form, showed the highest obedience, and humility, until His death. That is why He said: “I am gentle and humble in heart [Matthew 11:29].” Now I cannot begin to describe my state of mind when I am very happy or sad; how, then could I ever describe the high conept and ideology of Christ?  (p. 460)

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther warns about the dangers of allegorizing in preaching:

4448. It is dangerous to play with allegories in Christian instruction. Mostly  such words ring sweetly in our ears, but there is nothing behind them. They serve the preachers very well, when they know nothing about the subject or text. When they do not know the material, and fall into embarrassment, then they grasp for allegories, with which nothing certain is taught. That is why we must get used to sticking with the Holy Text.   (p. 226)

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther exposes our sinful ingratitude and discontent:

3662. It is the devil among us, that no one has enough. Whatever God gives someone, he is not satisfied with it. The lot of the other always looks better to us; the rich crop always stands in the stranger’s fields; and the neighbor always has the more productive cows, and it is the same way in our sphere; no one is satisfied with his profession. Cattle would like to carry a saddle, and the riding horse would like to be hitched to a plow. The more we have, the more we would like to have.   (p. 135-36)

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther marvels at the incarnation:

5528. It is the greatest honor known to us, that Christ was willing to lower himself so deeply among us and our sins and conceal from us his majesty for so long. At first he cried in the cradle, was nourished with a little milk. Then he was forced into exile. Came back, helped his father.He must have often fetched bread and milk for his mother. And certainly she said to him many times, “Where have you been? Why can’t you stay here at home?” To be unaffected by such weak and ordinary things, that is great wisdom.  (p. 434)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how believers should be the happiest people of all:

2457a. Whenever I compare Moses with Christ, Christ knocks the bottom out of the keg [to make a bullhorn] and shouts “Do not put your trust in Moses [i.e. the Law], but in me, Christ. Even though you are not pious, I am pious.” And this is the art of the Christian; that I fly from my sins, which are as certain as life itself, to the righteousness of Christ. As long as I live, I live in Him; when I die, then I will go to Him, I was baptized in Him, I receive Him in the Sacrament,  and I am guided by Him. He receives us with open arms; all we need to do is to trust in Him.  (p. 415-16).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how believers should be the happiest people of all:

1861. We know, praise God, that Christ has prevailed over the world, including its princes and the devil, that sin does not rule over us, now will death swallow us up. For that we should be justly much happier than the worldly over secular welfare, happiness, kingdoms, honor, power, and so on. For Scripture, which testifies to this, never fails (p. 411-12).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how Christ was a poor and unwise housekeeper:

1211. Christ kept house poorly and completely unwisely, because He Himself went hungry while He made others rich. (p. 404).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains which doctrines are the most difficult to accept:

6739. The Holy Trinity and the human origin of Christ are the most difficult articles of faith to accept. Although human reason can understand many things, that a child could be born of a virgin because God is all-powerful, it will not go so far as to accept that three persons can be in one eternal Godly form with equal powers and strengths, and so on, and that God Himself became man. That is just too much  (p. 470).

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how the devil is like a bird catcher:

1084. It belongs to a Christian that in moments of greatest weakness, he is strongest. In moments of greatest foolishness, he is wisest. The one as a result of meditation, the other through faith (p. 322).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how the devil is like a bird catcher:

3289ab. The devil is like a bird catcher. He rings the neck or strangles all of the birds he catches, except for a few he keeps and sets out in a little orchard to sing their songs and act as a decoy, so that he can catch and ensnare several more.  (p. 340).

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