Category Archives: Martin Luther

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther writes about counseling those who are troubled by the preaching of the Word:

“5288. God can tolerate glory in the world now and then, for example, in the case of jurists and doctors, but He cannot bear it in regard to theologians. Because a glory-seeking theologian necessarily diminishes Christ, who saved the entire world with his blood. God cannot permit that; that is why ambitious theologians are soon brought down and shattered..'” (p. 289)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther writes about counseling those who are troubled by the preaching of the Word:

“3188. If someone laments that he was so troubled by a sermon that he had to leave, comfort him so: ‘God receives two kinds of offerings, one is praise, and the other is a shattered heart.'” (p. 221)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther writes about God’s graciousness despite our rebellion:

“905. God gave us the sun, moon, stars, the elements, and all creation, our bodies, life; and placed at our disposal all He had created; and in addition to that, nothing less than Himself. And what did He reap from all that? That He should be scorned and His Son and followers killed, etc. In vain, He created us; in vain, He nourished us; in vain, He maintains us, etc.” (pp. 252)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther writes about our exile and the work of Christ to overcome it:

“5955. First, let us remember, that because of the fall of Adam, we were driven from paradise and became homeless and destitute. Second, let us think about the Son of God who shared our exile and brought us back to our Father’s kingdom from which we had been expelled. Third, that we remember the lesson of this exile and that our homeland is not upon this earth [Philippians 3:20], but there will come another life, namely the eternal” (pp. 297)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther writes about the burden and responsibilities of a preacher:

“453. If I were to write about the burden and responsibilities of a preacher, as I have experienced them, I would scare everyone away from it. For a good preacher must be of such a mind that nothing is dearer to him than Christ and His life; so that when he finally has lost this life, and everything, he knows Christ will say to him: ‘Come here to me, my dear son.’ I hope that He will also speak to me with those words on Judgment Day, for here all speak to me in an unfriendly way. I have the burden of the whole world, the emperor, and the Pope. But since I have been called to this, I must stand my ground and say: ‘What I do is right.’ After I was called, the devil attacked me many times and has tormented me with this argument: ‘You haven’t been called!’ As if I had been made a doctor for nothing.” (pp. 211)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther describes what should be expected of a “doctor of Scripture”:

“46. A doctor of the Scriptures should have complete knowledge and mastery of them, how they are related to each other–the Prophets, for example. Not just a certain part, as one could know Isaiah, not just one portion of the Laws or the Gospel. But now doctors spring from the weeds who do not have a correct understanding of just one passage. Jurists can humble their students, when they boast about their competence. For they have moot court and are able to practice. We, however, because we have no opportunity for exercises, cannot properly hone our students. As a result, it is experience alone that develops the theologian.” (pp. 207-8)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther paints a vivid picture of Scripture and the intensity with which we should study it::

“5355. Divine Scripture is a very fertile tree, and there is no branch which I have note shaken with my own hands, and knocked down a few apples.”

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

Since in all the revelry from Reformation Day I failed to get a Mondays with Marty post up this past week, I am making up for it with one of my favorites. In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther shows his sense of humor::

“3476. Tomorrow I have to give a lecture about Noah’s drunkenness. Therefore, I am going to drink enough tonight so that I can talk about this awful subject from experience. Dr. Cordatus said then: “In no case! It is necessary to do just the opposite!” Luther responded to that: One must accept the vices peculiar to each land. The Bohemians eat like pigs, the Wends steal, Germans guzzle without end. Dear Cordatus, how else would you deal with a German except by getting him drunk? Especially those who love neither music nor women?

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.

Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, I offer two quotes related to the Reformation in light of Reformation Day approaching this Sunday::

“67. I have set Christ and the Pope against each other, and as a result have put myself between the door and the hinge. If I should be brought down, Christ will certainly raise me up again” (p. 392-93)

“72. The entire foundation of the papacy consists of works, the Anabaptist is based upon suffering, the true Christian, however, neither on the one or other, but always on faith alone.” (p. 393)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.