Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther warns about the dangers of allegorizing in preaching:

4448. It is dangerous to play with allegories in Christian instruction. Mostly  such words ring sweetly in our ears, but there is nothing behind them. They serve the preachers very well, when they know nothing about the subject or text. When they do not know the material, and fall into embarrassment, then they grasp for allegories, with which nothing certain is taught. That is why we must get used to sticking with the Holy Text.   (p. 226)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther exposes our sinful ingratitude and discontent:

3662. It is the devil among us, that no one has enough. Whatever God gives someone, he is not satisfied with it. The lot of the other always looks better to us; the rich crop always stands in the stranger’s fields; and the neighbor always has the more productive cows, and it is the same way in our sphere; no one is satisfied with his profession. Cattle would like to carry a saddle, and the riding horse would like to be hitched to a plow. The more we have, the more we would like to have.   (p. 135-36)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther marvels at the incarnation:

5528. It is the greatest honor known to us, that Christ was willing to lower himself so deeply among us and our sins and conceal from us his majesty for so long. At first he cried in the cradle, was nourished with a little milk. Then he was forced into exile. Came back, helped his father.He must have often fetched bread and milk for his mother. And certainly she said to him many times, “Where have you been? Why can’t you stay here at home?” To be unaffected by such weak and ordinary things, that is great wisdom.  (p. 434)

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how believers should be the happiest people of all:

5528. Sing, dear children, sing about the newborn child! For if we don’t sing about Him, who should we sing about? Turkey, Greece, Israel, and the greater part of Germany are all silent. Only a few sing. Nevertheless, the dear angels sing and marvel over his birth, which is so lowly and so high. For they come down here and look into the depths of hell, in other words, how He became flesh; before long, they look to heaven and see Him in all His majesty, and cannot marvel enough over that, that the highest majesty would submit to becoming so low and then again that the ordinary was the most high  (p. 435-36).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how believers should be the happiest people of all:

2457a. Whenever I compare Moses with Christ, Christ knocks the bottom out of the keg [to make a bullhorn] and shouts “Do not put your trust in Moses [i.e. the Law], but in me, Christ. Even though you are not pious, I am pious.” And this is the art of the Christian; that I fly from my sins, which are as certain as life itself, to the righteousness of Christ. As long as I live, I live in Him; when I die, then I will go to Him, I was baptized in Him, I receive Him in the Sacrament,  and I am guided by Him. He receives us with open arms; all we need to do is to trust in Him.  (p. 415-16).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Week 11 – 2 Peter 3:11-18

In reaching Week 11 we reach the end of our study, covering 2 Peter 3:11-18. Peter concludes his discussion of eschatology by calling believers to live lives of holiness and godliness as they wait for and hasten the day of God (3:11-13). Our hope as believers rests in the promise of a new heavens and new earth in which righteousness dwells.

The final paragraph (3:14-18) draws the letter to a close by exhorting believers to diligently pursue spiritual growth. They must be on guard against false teachers distorting the Scriptures (including Paul’s letters).

Want to learn more? You can listen to the audio below and follow along with the handout.

Week 11 – 2 Peter 3,11-18 (Handout)

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how believers should be the happiest people of all:

1861. We know, praise God, that Christ has prevailed over the world, including its princes and the devil, that sin does not rule over us, now will death swallow us up. For that we should be justly much happier than the worldly over secular welfare, happiness, kingdoms, honor, power, and so on. For Scripture, which testifies to this, never fails (p. 411-12).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Week 10 – 2 Peter 3:1-10

As we come to 2 Peter 3:1-10, we finally discover a specific doctrine of the false teachers. They scoffed at the notion of Christ’s return, arguing that since the days of the patriarchs creation has continued along without any significant divine intervention in the world. In response Peter points to the cataclysmic judgment that God brought on the world through the flood. In a similar way he will bring judgment on this world, only this time through fire.

Peter encourages believers to remember that God’s timetable is not the same as ours. What seems like God’s slowness is in fact patience waiting for people to repent. But rest assured, Peter warns, the Day of the Lord will come like a thief, and along with it a fiery end to this present world.

Want to hear more? You can listen to the audio below and follow along with the handout:

Week 10 – 2 Peter 3,1-10 (Handout)

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how Christ was a poor and unwise housekeeper:

1211. Christ kept house poorly and completely unwisely, because He Himself went hungry while He made others rich. (p. 404).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Week 9 – 2 Peter 2:17-22

In 2 Peter 2:17-22 Peter continues his description of the false teachers and transitions into describing the state of those who have fallen prey to their errors. Instead of providing living water through the preaching of the gospel they are waterless springs. Instead of helping people get grounded in the truth of the gospel, they are mists driven by storms. Like skilled fishermen they lure the unsuspecting into their errors using sexual immorality and the empty promise of freedom.

Those who once professed faith in Christ but have now embraced the false teaching are in a dangerous position. Because they know the truth and have departed from it are in a worse state than unbelievers. They are like dogs who return to their vomit and pigs who wallow in the mud.

Want to hear more? You can use the handout and listen to the audio below.

Week 9 – 2 Peter 2,17-22 (Handout)

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