Announcing Bibleworks 10

For the last two months I have been working on another secret project: serving as a beta tester for Bibleworks 10. I have been using Bibleworks for over 20 years (starting with version 3.0!), and it has become an essential tool for me in studying God’s Word. Hardly a day goes by where I do not open Bibleworks, whether it’s to help me work on a lecture, write a book, prepare a sermon, or simply grow in my relationship with God. It is the Bible software that I recommend to my students and train them how to use. The value of what you get in the base package is simply without parallel in the world of Bible software. With the release of version 10, Bibleworks has further cemented its place as the premier software for studying the Biblical text, especially in the original languages.

The base package includes a number of improvements to an already strong foundation. In addition to several changes that allow the user greater flexibility in the interface, Bibleworks 10 includes a number of new features. An EPUB reader allows you to use e-books to enhance your study of Scripture. The Forms tab instantly allows you to see all the forms of a word and the number of occurrences of each form. The User Lexicon Tab allows you to create your own custom lexical entry for words that is saved automatically. High resolution images of the Leningradensis Codex allow you to see the manuscript basis for many of our Hebrew texts, joining an existing collection of key NT manuscripts. Sound files for the Greek NT allow you to listen to the text being read.

Bibleworks 10 also has several new add-on modules available for an additional cost. Perhaps the most exciting are the Stuttgart Original Languages Packages OT and NT editions.  These modules contain the critical apparatus found in the printed text (NT=NA28; OT=BHS4) as well as other tools produced by German Bible Society. The ESV Bible Atlas is another helpful resource available as well.

You can find ordering information here or upgrade information here: Here is a brief video introducing Bibleworks 10:

 

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains why our sin should not cause us to despair:

6664. We are all great sinners, but we should not despair or abandon hope because of our sins. For God has made it known to all that forgiveness of sins applies to everyone who acknowledges and confesses their sins from the heart, and that no one is excluded who remains true to his word and clings to the faith  (p. 466).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains why hope is so essential:

3828. Everything that comes to pass in the world is based on hope. No farmer would sow grain if he did not have hope for the seed. No young man would marry if he had no hope of offspring. No businessman or daily wage earner would work if he did not expect a profit or wages. And even more does the hope for eternal life carry us on!  (p. 424).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther reminds us of the implications of the resurrection:

669. If God is for us, who can be against us [Romans 8:31]? Death is swallowed up by victory (1 Cor 15:55]. And if that is the case with death, then it is the same with sin. If death, then also with all diseases. If death, then also all suffering. If death, then also all acts of the devil. If death, then also the fury of the world. But all of that is not yet apparent. Yes, today we see the opposite. Therefore faith is important. The unveiled manifestation of things will, in due time, follow faith. What is now invisible will, at that time, will become visible. Likewise, (just as it was in the beginning) the visible will be made from the invisible world  (p. 399-400).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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“Letter Carriers and Paul’s Use of Scripture” Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters

The most recent issue of the Journal for the Study of Paul and His Letters contains an article I wrote entitled “Letter Carriers and Paul’s Use of Scripture.” Here is the abstract:

Within the discussion of Paul’s use of Scripture, scholars have frequently wondered how his predominantly Gentile congregations would have recognized his often subtle allusions to and echoes of the Old Testament, let alone their broader context. One solution has been to suggest that the carrier of the letter played a role in further explaining its contents. In order to assess the validity of this possibility, this article begins by exploring the role of letter carriers in the ancient world. A survey of the Pauline epistles indicates that his letter carriers performed a similar range of tasks; they were more than merely couriers. They were similar to Greco-Roman envoys, sent as a manifestation of Paul’s παρουσία and authorized to act on his behalf. As a result of this survey, two implications emerge for the study of Paul’s use of Scripture and the audience’s competency to recognize it: (1) Paul’s use of envoys suggests they were authorized to explain the contents of the letter further, including his use of Scripture. (2) Given the letter’s role to mediate the very presence of Paul himself, it is reasonable to conclude that his envoys engaged in teaching, a central component of his own ministry. Thus, there are solid grounds for suggesting that Paul’s letter carriers played a role in helping the audience to recognize Old Testament allusions and echoes, as well as their original context.

If you are interested in the study of the how the NT authors use the OT, this article is for you.

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains what kind of reader Scripture requires:

5017. Holy Scripture demands a humble reader, who trembling shows reverence to God’s Word, who constantly pleads: “Teach me, teach me, teach me!” The arrogant oppose the spirit. And even though some may study diligently, and unerringly preach Christ for a time–as soon as they become proud, God closes the church to them. Wherefore every proud person becomes a heretic, if not actually, then for all practical purposes. It is difficult for a person who has excellent gifts not to become arrogant. Those upon whom God bestows great gifts, He plagues with great torments, to teach them that they are nothing. (p. 362).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Citizens of God’s Kingdom – Phil 1:27-30 (Sermon Audio)

One thing you realize very quickly when you travel internationally is the value and importance of a passport. As you enter and leave a country you need to be able to show that passport, or you aren’t going anywhere. That passport is tangible proof of your citizenship, the place you call home. Indeed, in the past it was even common to refer to the country you were from as your homeland.

When we talk about citizenship, we are at some level also talking about our identity. Our citizenship plays a role in shaping who we are, what we value, what is important to us, and how we live. Since as believers we are citizens of God’s kingdom, that reality should shape the way that we we live as sojourners and exiles in this world.

What does it mean to live as a citizen of God’s kingdom? What is it that governs our lives as citizens of God’s kingdom?

This past Sunday I had the privilege of answering these questions as I preached on Philippians 1:27-30. You can find the audio here, and read even more about it in my Philippians commentary.

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The Presentation of Studies in the Pauline Epistles

This past November I had the privilege of revealing the “secret project” I had been working on for four years: Studies in the Pauline Epistles: Essays in Honor of Douglas J. Moo. We surprised him with it at the dinner celebrating the 50th Anniversary celebration of NIV, held during the annual ETS conference.  Here is the video of our presentation:

Zondervan has also posted brief interviews with me and my co-editor Jay Smith, highlighting some of the distinctive features of this collection of essays:

You can purchase it on Amazon and other places online.

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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how theology thrives:

1340. Theology thrives in use and practice, not in speculation. In summary, every household and worldly craft which is not put into practice, but remains only learned in theory, will be lost and amount to nothing. When one in a trade calculates how much business he would like to do that year, he is only speculating and is in the thinking and estimating stage, and when it comes to actuality, things are quite different. Just like in these days as it generally happens, for example, as I well know and have experienced. (p. 407).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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Mondays with Marty

In this week’s installment from Off the Record with Martin Luther, Luther explains how clouds and works righteousness are alike:

3335. Clouds, which drift overhead but produce no rain, are like the righteousness of the Laws, which promise much, but yield nothing but hypocrisy. (p. 419).

DISCLAIMER: The views reflected in this quote do not necessarily reflect those of the author of this blog. This quote is shared in the interest of edification, education, and/or humor.
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